why breadfruit?

Health Benefits

Breadfruit is high in carbohydrates and a good source of antioxidants, calcium, carotenoids, copper, dietary fiber, energy, iron, magnesium, niacin, omega 3, omega 6, phosphorus, potassium, protein, thiamine, vitamin A and vitamin C.

Multipurpose

Not only a substantial food source, the breadfruit tree also provides a multitude of other advantageous uses.

Gluten-Free Flour: Breadfruit can be processed into a gluten-free flour, far superior in taste, nutrition and structure to any other GF flour alternative.

Insect Repellant: In addition to being a safer alternative to DEET, the male breadfruit flower is highly effective at repelling mosquitoes and other insects.

Latex: The sap excreted from the breadfruit can be used as a waterproof caulking for watercrafts and homes, as well as chewing gum.

Fabric: Fibers from the bark of the breadfruit tree can be harvested without killing the crop and used to make mosquito nets, clothing, accessories, artwork and even paper.

Animal Feed: Fallen fruits, as well as the leaves of the tree, can be used as nutritious animal feed.

Methods of Preparation

Breadfruit is gluten-free and can be consumed at all stages of development; ripe as a fruit or mature as a vegetable—where it can replace conventional starches. (Think of it as a tropical potato.) As the fruit ripens, the starches convert to sugars and the flesh softens to a custard-like consistency. Aside from being eaten raw, breadfruit can be baked, boiled, candied, fried, pickled, roasted and steamed. The fruit can be shredded, dried for storage or easily processed into gluten-free flour.

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